Produce Report: Beautifully Green

Hello all and Happy Monday! It’s a new week with more fantastic fruits and veggies. This week is the week of great green goodness. Romanesco Broccoli has returned, as has regular broccoli. Topping it off are gorgeous heads of escarole – a true favorite for its versatility and delicious flavor. Just see how great they look….

Romanesco

Unique in it’s beauty and flavor, Romanesco broccoli/cauliflower is truly awesome. According to the Chicago Tribune, “Romanesco broccoli is an edible flower with distinctive pointy, green florets. Cavolo broccolo romanesco, as it is known in Italian, has become increasingly popular in American cooking in the last decade, but this hybrid vegetable dates back to the 16th century.”

It is sweet and mild, and perfect with so many flavors. Check out these Romanesco recipes!

Broccoli

Classically perfect, our traditional broccoli is also in fine shape! It is super healthy and tasty cooked or raw. Did you know, broccoli is an important calcium source for those who don’t consume dairy products? Broccoli is packed with vitamin C, vitamin A (mostly as beta-carotene), folic acid, fiber, and, of course, fiber!

Escarole

Delicate and savory, escarole is such a treat. According to CookThink.com:

Escarole is a variety of endive whose leaves are broader, paler and less bitter than other members of the endive family. In taste — but not color — it is almost indistinguishable from radicchio.

Like radicchio, kale and chard, escarole is a hearty green that thrives late into the growing season. The heart of an escarole head is less bitter because the leaves haven’t gotten as much sunlight. (Some farmers even cultivate these pale leaves by covering the plants and depriving them of sunlight.)

High in folic acid, fiber, and vitamins A and K, escarole can be eaten raw or gently cooked. Try tossing a few escarole leaves into a mild salad, serving some quickly wilted with lemon juice, or stir chopped escarole into soup. A medium head of escarole usually yields about seven cups of torn leaves.

Looking for the best way to eat this fantastic leaf? Try our spotlight recipe of the week!

What’s your favorite item this week? Share your favorite recipes and photos on our Facebook page

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